TZ Cassiopeiae

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TZ Cassiopeiae, also known as TZ Cas, HIP 117763, and SAO 20912, is a red supergiant star located in the Cassiopeia constellation 8,000 light years away from Earth.

TZ Cassiopeiae was reported as being variable by Williamina Fleming and published posthumously in 1911.[1] It is a slow irregular variable star with a possible period of 3,100 days.[2] It is over 60,000 times the luminosity of the Sun, and it is 645 to 800 times bigger than the Sun. It is a member of the Cas OB5 stellar association, together with the nearby red supergiant PZ Cassiopeiae.[3]

References[edit]

  1. Fleming, Williamina; Pickering, Edward C. (1911). "Stars Having Peculiar Spectra. 31 New Variable Stars". Harvard College Observatory Circular 167: 1. Bibcode 1911HarCi.167....1F.
  2. Kiss, L. L.; Szabó, G. M.; Bedding, T. R. (2006). "Variability in red supergiant stars: Pulsations, long secondary periods and convection noise". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 372 (4): 1721. arXiv:astro-ph/0608438. Bibcode 2006MNRAS.372.1721K. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2006.10973.x.
  3. Humphreys, R. M. (1978). "Studies of luminous stars in nearby galaxies. I. Supergiants and O stars in the Milky Way". Astrophysical Journal 38: 309. Bibcode 1978ApJS...38..309H. doi:10.1086/190559.


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