Baltica and Avalonia

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Geology of Europe. Everything circled in red was part of Baltica. Everything circled in blue was part of Avalonia. Everything circled in green was part of Gondwana.

Baltica was the original form of western Icons-flag-ru.png Russia (including Moscow) and northern Europe and was a continent that existed between 1,800 to 200 million years ago. As for Avalonia, it was an independent continent that existed 500 million years ago and is now part of modern day Icons-flag-gb-eng.png England and Icons-flag-de.png Germany.

Geological History[edit]

  • 1.1 billion years ago, Baltica was located in what is now the southern Pacific Ocean. The current location of Australia is provided for reference. The continent north of Baltica is Laurentia.
    1.82 billion years ago, Baltica was part of the major supercontinent Columbia.
  • 1.5 billion years ago, Baltica along with Arctica (Laurentia + Siberia) and Icons-flag-aq.png Antarctica were part of the minor supercontinent Nena.
  • 1.07 billion years ago, Baltica was part of the major supercontinent Rodinia.
  • 600 million years ago, Baltica was part of the major supercontinent Pannotia.
  • During the Cambrian, Baltica was an independent continent.
  • During the Late Ordovician, Baltica collided with Avalonia (most of modern Western Europe).
  • During the Devonian, Baltica collided against Laurentia, forming the minor supercontinent Laurussia.
  • During the Permian, all major continents collided against each other to form the major supercontinent Pangaea.
  • During the Jurassic, Pangaea rifted into two minor supercontinents, Laurasia and Gondwana. Baltica was part of the minor supercontinent Laurasia.
  • During the Cretaceous, Baltica was part of the minor supercontinent Eurasia.
  • Today, Baltica is part of the continent Eurasia, and more commonly known under the alias Europe (named after Europa, the mother of Minos of Crete, the largest Icons-flag-gr.png Greek island).

See also[edit]

References[edit]