Bright giant

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The luminosity class II in the Yerkes spectral classification is given to bright giants. These are stars which straddle the boundary between ordinary giants and supergiants, based on the appearance of their spectra.[1]

Example bright giants

Well known stars which are classified as bright giants include:

See also

References

  1. Abt, Helmut A. (1957). "Line Broadening in High-Luminosity Stars. I. Bright Giants". Astrophysical Journal 126: 503. Bibcode 1957ApJ...126..503A. doi:10.1086/146423.


{{{1}}}
Observation data
Epoch {{{epoch}}}      Equinox
Constellation {{{3}}}
{{{component1}}}
Right ascension {{{ra1}}}
Declination {{{dec1}}}
Apparent magnitude (V) {{{appmag_v1}}}
{{{component2}}}
Right ascension {{{ra2}}}
Declination {{{dec2}}}
Apparent magnitude (V) {{{appmag_v2}}}
Characteristics
Evolutionary stage {{{9}}}
Spectral type {{{7}}}
Astrometry
Distance{{{4}}} ly
Details
Radius{{{5}}} R
Diameter{{{5}}} D
Luminosity (bolometric){{{11}}} L
Temperature{{{8}}} K
Other designations
{{{1}}}, {{{2}}}

{{{1}}}, also known as {{{2}}}, is a star located in the constellation {{{3}}}. It is located {{{4}}} light years away from the Earth. {{{1}}} has a diameter of {{{5}}} D, making it around the size of the orbit of {{{6}}}. {{{1}}} has a stellar class of {{{7}}} and a temperature of {{{8}}} degrees Kelvin; it is a {{{9}}} that is currently burning {{{10}}} within its core. {{{1}}} is around {{{11}}} times brighter than the Sun. {{{12}}}{{{13}}}

References



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